Wolverines in Sweden

Wolverine

Wolverines in Sweden

Though Sweden’s population is only a couple of hundred, wolverines are spreading slowly south into the areas away from the reindeer herds. A protected species in Sweden, the population is nevertheless subject to illegal hunting and persecution, usually as a result of conflict with the interests of reindeer herding. Since 1993 there has been an ongoing project to study the species with a view to planning for its conservation, in and around Sarek National Park in Lapland – a large expanse of trackless mountains often called “Europe’s Last Wilderness”. A total of 168 wolverines have been captured and fitted with radio transmitters to allow scientists to monitor their movements and behaviour.

Snowshoeing in Wolverine Country

Snowshoeing is an ideal way to explore the winter landscape, moving quietly across snow-carpeted frozen lakes and through magical pathless forests of birch and pine. Enjoy real coffee made on warming fires, sleep well in high-quality Hilleberg tents and experience the real sound of silence. Along the way you will see dozens of tracks left by the animals which inhabit the region, with luck including those of wolverine and lynx, two of Sweden’s rarest animals, which have a stronghold in this area.